NaBloPoMo – Wang Laptop

Yep here are pictures of my Wang.  Laptop that is.  This the Wang laptop.  I believe they only made one model.  Wang was noted for word-processing systems and the Wang Laptop is very word processor oriented.  It even has a printer built-in.  Remove the display and it looks like a typewriter.  The Wang laptop was MS-DOS based but not 100% IBM compatible.  It would run some but not all IBM software.  The display and associated hardware were definitely different.  So if you used standard calls to write to the display,  your software would work.  However,  if you wrote directly to the display hardware,  it would puke.  Definitely not CGA (Color Graphics Adaptor) here. But would run any monochrome text application fine.   A friend gave me this system and I used it mainly as 100 digit calculator (custom software) while working on number theory.  It works,  well at least it did when I last used it.  I need to find the external powersupply.

It has a built-in modem, serial port, keypad port and SCSI interface for floppy drives.  Yes SCSI for floppy drives.  It used an NEC V30 processor, hard drive and up to 720 KB of RAM.  The display was detachable for future upgrades (there were none).  Starting price in the mid 1980s was $4000!

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9 Responses to NaBloPoMo – Wang Laptop

  1. crankypants says:

    huh huh…you said wang….
    😉

  2. Lurkertype says:

    That price shows why nobody bought it.

  3. mad-tante says:

    DUDE! Wang made a LAPTOP, holy shite!When I came to this company, I actually sat at a drawing board and worked on positive and negatives (light tables for those actually)…BY HAND.Anyhoo, we used Wangs (which even in the mid-90s looked pre-historic) for all businessy keeping track of orders…or something. I can't even remember. You know you're old/ been at a job too long when you can't remember the way you used to do things. That was a fun memory, Cheers!

  4. Lord Kalvan says:

    Wang computers were big for a short while. But the laptop never was. Partly because of its price and also it was released just as the IBM steam roller got into gear. And I probably have been at my job too long too. But I started just after we decommissioned the Wang word processing system.

  5. fpnl says:

    i still have !

    • Kees Dieleman says:

      Hello fpnl,
      I have a working Wang WLTC laptop with a working 5.1/4″ floppy drive. I also have a Wang system disk, which is still in a good condition (working, no errors).
      What I don’t have is the manual for this laptop. If yiu do have the manual is it possible for you to sent me a copy?

      I would like to hear/read your reaction on this.

      Greetings, Kees Dieleman (cpdieleman@hotmail.com)

  6. Jan says:

    hello all, I also still have this computer “somewere” – never powerd it up since years. I know that there is an onboard batterypack which needs to be replaced every 4-5 years. I also have the original system installation discs and the wordprocessing application discs. all in 5.1/4″. if anyone also still has a working version of this I would like to get in contact. My problem: I assume that the discs are no more readable. The harddisc is SCSI 10MB (there also was the bigger version with 20MB) and i wonder if it is possible to make an image of this disc to run it in a virtual machine. I think I even have all the original manuals. (My father used to have the green Wang 2200 with datacassette. It started with 4kb RAM and later was upgraded to 16kb RAM.)

    • Kees Dieleman says:

      Hello Jan,
      I have a working Wang WLTC laptop with a working 5.1/4″ floppy drive. I also have a Wang system disk, which is still in a good condition (working, no errors). Maybe I can help you with some things.
      What I don’t haven is the manual for this laptop. So if it is possible for you could you sent me an copy of this manual.

      I would like to hear/read your reaction on this.

      Greetings, Kees Dieleman (cpdieleman@hotmail.com)

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